World

Greek Crisis: Clashes Break Out At Anti-Austerity March In Athens

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| July 16 , 2015 , 00:02 IST
[caption id="attachment_82639" align="aligncenter" width="700"]Riot police try to avoid petrol bombs during clashes in Athens, Wednesday, July 15, 2015. Greece has a tentative rescue deal, but relief that it is not falling out of the euro is unlikely to last long: its economy has taken a huge hit. Months of political brinkmanship, uncertainty and bank closures have hurt companies and brought everyday business to a standstill. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti) Riot police try to avoid petrol bombs during clashes in Athens, Wednesday, July 15, 2015. Greece has a tentative rescue deal, but relief that it is not falling out of the euro is unlikely to last long: its economy has taken a huge hit. Months of political brinkmanship, uncertainty and bank closures have hurt companies and brought everyday business to a standstill. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)[/caption] Clashes have broken out at an anti-austerity rally by thousands of protesters outside Parliament in Athens. Riot police used pepper spray and tear gas Wednesday night to fight back youths in the crowd who were hurling Molotov cocktails and rocks at police. [caption id="attachment_82640" align="aligncenter" width="700"]Members of the Communist-affiliated PAME labor union shout slogans during an anti-austerity rally in Athens, Wednesday, July 15, 2015. Greece has a tentative rescue deal, but relief that it is not falling out of the euro is unlikely to last long: its economy has taken a huge hit. Months of political brinkmanship, uncertainty and bank closures have hurt companies and brought everyday business to a standstill. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris) Members of the Communist-affiliated PAME labor union shout slogans during an anti-austerity rally in Athens, Wednesday, July 15, 2015. Greece has a tentative rescue deal, but relief that it is not falling out of the euro is unlikely to last long: its economy has taken a huge hit. Months of political brinkmanship, uncertainty and bank closures have hurt companies and brought everyday business to a standstill. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)[/caption] Police said about 12,500 people were at the rally at Syntagma Square. The clashes broke out just as lawmakers were starting to debate an austerity bill that includes consumer tax increases and pension reforms. Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, who has faced strident opposition to the bill from his own radical left Syriza party, says it's the best possible deal he could get to prevent Greece from being forced out of Europe's joint euro currency.