Education

M S University Senate Member Calls For Barring 'Communists' From Getting Admission

DIVYIA ASTHANA | 0
5798
| March 27 , 2018 , 14:27 IST

Institutes while granting admission to prospective students consider a variety of factors, academic record, extra-curricular/sports record, working experience, personality and communication skills.

A senate member of the M S University (MSU) in Gujarat's Baroda on Monday called for adding another criterion; political leaning. He said that 'Communists' should be barred from getting admission to the university lest they “break Gujarat into pieces”.

ALSO READ: It's Time To End Communist Rule In Tripura : Amit Shah

Hasmukh Vaghela, speaking at an annual meeting of senate members demanded suspension of 2 students of MSU's Institute of Leadership and Governance who were allegedly rusticated after meeting with former JNU students’ union president Kanhaiya Kumar. The institute however, denied that it had rusticated the two students.

“MSU should not fall prey to communist forces," said Vaghela, adding that such students "should be suspended.”

Defending his demand for the suspension of the concerned students, Vaghela said, “I have background details of the student in question, which is why I am making this remark. The student has a Communist leaning."

ALSO READ: Lok Sabha Polls 2019: Kanhaiya Kumar Likely To Be CPI Candidate From Begusarai

Vaghela, who represents MSU's Department of Pharmacy, was quoted by The Indian Express as saying, "It is necessary to keep Communist forces away. Communists should not be admitted to the MS University. They will break Gujarat into pieces. We have never had Communists in Gujarat and we should never have them.”

The comments made by Vaghela were seconded by other senate members at the meeting who showed their support by banging the benches.

Meanwhile, MSU Registrar Neerja Jaiswal rejected all such statements calling them "baseless and illogical".

“A student is a student for us. We don’t even ask their religion in the admission form. How and why would we ask them their political background or political ideology. It is their choice,” Jaiswal said.